Pattern

Pepto Flower Bag

Still not in garment sewing mode here. I have a few projects that are partly done but I’m just not feeling their next steps. Lately when I’ve been going in my sewing room, it’s whatever seems like the best thing to work on. So what was the best thing to work on today? A rather large clutch/crossbody bag.

I’ve made bags in the past but usually without a pattern. It’s kind of a crazy free for all. What do I need in the bag? Lots of pockets? Do I need to carry my whole life in it? Do I want it large or small? These and so many more thoughts go into my bag making. Well LBG Studio just made it a lot easier for me. They have the Lexie Foldover Bag pattern. It can be a clutch or crossbody bag. Do you want it large or small? Well they have that option. Do you want extra pockets? Zipper pockets? Accents? A whole butt load of pockets? YUP! They have all those options in this one pattern. It’s really unbelievable!

When I sat down to determine what I wanted for my bag, I decided I wanted it all because why not? I chose:

    Large Size
    Front Accent
    Front Pocket
    Front Welt Zipper Pocket
    Internal Pockets

It’s really crazy how many options you can have with this bag and I have to say the instructions are awesome at illustrating them all. Also, I’m horrible at reading instructions. I just don’t. I figure I know what order things should go in since I’ve been sewing for so long and that is so not the right thing to do with this. I started by sewing pieces together that shouldn’t be so I had to rip them apart and that was all I needed to realize that I don’t have a damn idea of what I’m doing. Even after this realization I kept trying to skim the instructions (I don’t like instructions) and kept getting lost and confused. Every time that happened and I actually read the instructions it quickly got me back on track.

Let’s take a closer look at the bag!

Here’s two pockets in one shot. The welt, zipper pocket that always seems so intimidating but never as bad as it seems. The other is a deep front pocket that you can see the majority of my hand going into. It goes to the bottom of the bag. This bag is serious when it comes to pockets.

I couldn’t get a good shot of the inside pockets. Probably doesn’t help that I have a bunch of stuff in the bag. I started using it right away! On the left side of this pic, there’s a set of two pockets. They’re made from one panel of fabric so the pockets are side by side. Good for small stuff like a mirror, chapsticks, three lip glosses and other random things that usually run rouge in your bag.

I did choose the adjustable option for the strap. I got this little slider for $.25 at a local fabric store. I’m happy I chose that option because I change the purse from a crossbody to a shoulder bag. It’s nice to be able to have a choice.

You can see on Gert that when I open the whole bag up it’s really tall. I can fit a bunch of stuff over and fold the top over. It doesn’t have to necessarily make it down to that magnetic snap. Everything in the bag is secure though. You have the zippered top so no worries of anything falling out!

This pattern is truly amazing! The options alone are worth the buy. I’m already planning on making this bag again in denim. I have a lot of leftover bits here and there and I think it would be super awesome and versatile.

McPattern

Originally was going to name this post MC Pattern for Mac’s Crafts but isn’t McPattern so much better? A little Irish and a little bit awful food chain.

A natural progression in sewing with patterns is creating your own right? I’m starting off quite simple.  A tank top.  Not too difficult. I’ve been seeing the Ogden Cami everywhere.  While I do like it, I wanted something super swingy.  Almost like a circle skirt but a top. I also wanted it to be a razor back. I think I was a tidbit influenced by my love of my Simone dresses/top.

It took me quite a while to draft the pattern.  I started with the Sorbetto by Colette. I know the top fits me well and the bust darts sit right on my body.  I copied the lines around the arm and up to the top of the shoulder. From there it was wild! I created curve after curve trying to find the right point on the front to swing the arc.  I wanted the bottom to end up being straight across.

I did make a quick muslin of the front out of an old t-shirt to check the darts and make sure I didn’t make the front too low/high.  When I decided I was happy I took a deep breath and cut my fabric. I’ve bought something similar before and loved it. It’s from Fabric.com and it’s concerned a workwear fabric. I believe it’s meant to be for a work shirt uniform type deal.  I like it because I don’t need to iron it and it looks great!


I totally went all out with this shirt too.  I did French seams along the sides.  Pain in my ass.  I don’t care what fabric you use, but it looks soooo pretty.


I made a ton of bias tape.  The tape went across the top of the front and back. It also created the straps.  I cut 2” wide strips of fabric for these.  I wanted to make sure they were decently beefy but not too beefy.


I made smaller width tape to go along the bottom of the shirt. Have you ever applied bias tape the French way? It’s easier. I read a post about it somewhere so I thought I would give it a go.  Pretty much you fold the bias tape in half once.  Sew that shit on the edge. Fold it one more time and top stitch around.  That’s it.


I’m super happy with this shirt.  There is one little point in the straps that is a little wonky.  It’s where the strap starts to curve around the front. It’s too much of a curve that it starts to buckle.  You have to look really hard to see it though.  I’m sure it’s an easy adjustment to the pattern.  Move the points out more to create a gentler curve. I’m wondering if the black is helping to hide the mistake.


Side shot with my snuggle baby Frankie. I was concerned about my shirt looking a bit maternity-like but it doesn’t billow out too terribly.


There’s a lot of fabric to this shirt. It makes it so light and breezy.


I loved the black one so much I made it in orange too. The fabric weight is different. It’s heavier and has much less drape. It is much more voluminous. I think next I’d like to try it in a knit.


Oh and just like a circle skirt.  This bad boy twirls too! Yippee! Angry twirl face. The orange fabric was not having it was well as the black.


Feeling quite accomplished with my first garment pattern. I’ll keep making a lot more of these. It’s an awesome simple wardrobe staple.  Plus it gives me extra satisfaction knowing I made the pattern.

Grey Jacket Cuteness

I love free patterns. Free patterns are every sewist dream. This free pattern comes from Camelot Fabrics. It looks like they do this on a weekly basis so I would be sure to check them out frequently. The pattern I went for is the Cropped Jacket tutorial.

Jacket Turned Out

Jacket Closed

I didn’t think the cropped look would work on me so I lengthened it by about 4″. I used grey suiting that I bought from Fabric.com and black lining from JoAnn Fabrics.

Sleeve

The pattern was easy to cut out. I’m not sure I understood why the sleeve was in two pieces and not one. Next time I’m going to cut it as one to avoid the seam.

Edge Stitch

The pattern didn’t mention that you should edge stitch the lining to keep the lining from rolling to the outside when it hangs. I did it on my Doctor Who waistcoat and it seemed like a good idea on this.

Finished Jacket

I’m happy with how the jacket looks especially with the extra length. This is a really easy beginner sewing project. I’m sure I’ll make another. I was thinking hot pink with paisley lining. Fun, bright and much more me!

Back

I might make the back piece a bit bigger next time to make the jacket hang looser. This really was a great pattern and did I mention it was free!?!