Named

Coat Me

I’m going to come right out and say it, I MADE A COAT!

This has probably been over a year in planning. I couldn’t find the right fabric for the longest time. I knew I wanted a brocade but everyone I looked at never spoke to me. Thankfully I follow FabScrap on Instagram. Every so often they have these flash sales and advertise some thing they have on their site for sale. That’s when I found the most beautiful brocade. It’s floral and is just a sea of beauty.

I already knew what coat pattern I was going to use. During my first round of #sewmystyle, the coat that was included was the Yona Wrap Coat by Named Patterns. It’s shown as a wrap coat but has an option for 3 buttons. I was going for the buttoned version. I was concerned about the straight sides of the coat. I have a butt and it needs roam to breathe.

I did make a muslin of this coat as is. I was completely right! The coat and my butt did not get along. I decided to flare out the bottom to make more of an A-line style coat. I added 3″ to the bottom of the sides of the front and back pieces. It gives it enough room to make me super happy.

Putting the outside together wasn’t too bad until I got to the collar in front facings. I didn’t really understand the direction very well. The thing about Named is that their instructions do not have a lot of pictures or written instructions. They’re not made for beginners. I sat and pinned for a while until I felt confident to sew it in place.

I changed up the pockets. They are supposed to be patch pockets. That was not classy enough for me. I wanted welt pockets. I’ve done double welts before so a single welt pocket was super easy! They look fab!

I was in no hurry to complete my coat. Especially since this was my first one. I went to JoAnn’s to check out their linings. Unfortunately they did not a have fun purple that I was shooting for. I did find the type of fabric I wanted. A 100% Rayon that has a bit of slip to it so I can easily get the coat on and off without it wanting to grab my clothes. I searched online and found what I needed! Stone Mountain Fabric had Bemberg lining which is the same stuff as JoAnn’s but with all the color ways!

I decided I wanted to make bound button holes. Never completed them before and didn’t practice! I went ahead, fearlessly, and hacked at my coat. They didn’t turn out perfect but damn am I still happy with them. I knew I wanted metal buttons and they look classy!

I bagged the lining of the jacket. My first time out for that too. It turned out so pretty! Way easier than it looks so I totally recommend it to anyone thinking about completing a coat. Stitching the hole in the lining was the last task before a final pressing.

LOOK AT IT! It’s so springy and happy. The jacket has 3 buttons but I really only use the top button. It makes it easy for the coat to open when I sit and it makes the front flap open to see the pretty lining.

All in the Cards

I can’t stop remaking patterns this year. I’ve made the Toaster Sweater from Sew House 7 three times (one, two, three) and now I’m on my second Saunio Cardigan by Named. Last time I made the pattern, I whined about the shoulder seam being too far down my little bony shoulder. The other annoyance was how far away the sweater sits away from my neck.

When cutting the pattern I added 1″ to the neckline. I shortened the shoulder piece so it wouldn’t droop down my shoulder. I had to extend the sleeve top to make up for all the length I cut off the shoulder. Not sure how much I took off the shoulder and added to the sleeve. I just started hacking like you sometimes do. I did plan on adding 4″ to the bottom of the cardigan but I didn’t have enough for the facings when I got to cutting them. I was about 2″ short. I’ll talk about how I dealt with this in a minute.

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Now that’s a happy shoulder seam. It’s right where it belongs. Moving the seam didn’t take away any of the swing of the cardigan. It’s sill roomy and doesn’t feel constricting at the arms.

Since the facings were short (because of my lack of fabric) and on my first Saunio, I was a little annoyed by all the overlapping fabric in this area. I needed to create a solution. I stitched the edge of the facing bottom to the bottom of the front piece.  This created almost a tube in this area.  It also made a hole where the facing and the front were not connected on the left side of this pic between the bottom of the cardigan and the edge.  I flipped to the inside of the facing and front piece and stitched the seam allowance. This closed up the hole and made it where I didn’t lose length just created a large hem at the bottom.  The only thing encased in there is the seam allowance.  There’s no bulk. I stitched all along the bottom to secure the facing and created my hem.

As I mentioned before, I did add 4″ of length but after my upturn at the bottom it equates to about half of that.  I’m okay with it.  I really like the width from the stitch line to the bottom of the cardigan.  Happy accident.

The bottom hem is 2″.  The one on the sleeve is 5/8″.  Majorly different but worked for each area. On my last one, I know I turned under quite a bit more on the sleeve. I liked where this sleeve hit with the small fold so no point in adding more.

I think this has potential to have a closure at the waist.  What do you think?  Not on this one because I like it as is, but if I do the pattern again.  I like the way the front flap fell when I was playing around with it while taking pictures.  I think a big button or a frog closure could be interesting. Or it could be simple and I can make a belt which a lot of people did when they made this for February’s #sewmystyle. Maybe even work ties into the side seams. That way the belt is always with the sweater.

The original pattern has a slight curve from the neck down to the tip of the sweater front. I decided to straighten out the line on this.  I didn’t really understand why it was curved and a straight line is easier to sew!

Definitely love this one more than the purple one. The purple color is fantastic but I keep looking at those damn shoulder seams.  The fabric for this one is super soft and light enough for the office to keep me warm when they have the a/c turned to arctic. I’m way happier with this pattern now!

February: Project Sew My Style

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We’re at month two of Project: Sew My Style.  February’s make is the Saunio Cardigan by Named. I think quite a few people have the same sentiment when it comes to this month’s make,”This is so not my style”. I love a good cardigan, but finding an acceptable heavy weight sweater knit fabric is near impossible and the dropped shoulder…uuggghhhhh… I detest a shoulder seam that does not sit at that bony little mass I consider my shoulder.


I searched high and low for a fabric I liked. I saved a few images and every time I went back to them I deleted them all. I gave up and decided my sweater had to be lightweight. I came across a great eggplant sweater knit at Stylish Fabric.  It says that it’s a thick Hacci fabric. Which means it’s a lightweight sweater knit. 

The cardigan has a short length and if you read my January Sew My Style post you’ll know I’m not a fan so I added 4″ to the bottom to the small size. I thought about making the neck area wider so it would come closer to the neck and straightening out the curve on the front pieces near the neck so it looks more like a waterfall. I did change my mind before cutting because I felt I owed it to the pattern to make it “as is” except for the length. I can’t do a shorty cardi.

One thing I despise about Named patterns is the overlap of the pattern pieces on the pdf. Fron past experiences with the pattern company, I knew to print out two copies of the pattern. If you traced the pattern, you wouldn’t need to print multiples and figure out the puzzle to have all pieces whole at the end of the ordeal. Taping together pdf patterns is already a chore, and I really would love it if Named figured out a better and faster way to print their patterns. With that off my chest, let’s push forward!

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Cutting out the pieces went super fast. I used my serger for all the seams because little bits of knit were flying everywhere! Purple confetti people! The construction of the sleeves was a little different than I’m used to. Usually I sew the sleeve length then sew onto the completed bodice. This instructs to sew the sleeve piece on the bodice then sew the length of the entire side of the cardigan all the way to the end of the sleeve in one swoop.  This way was a little difficult to get the seam perfectly lined up under the arm.


This sweater was a nice quick sew. I finished it in one sitting which is rare for me. I did add a bit more top stitching. It’s a little hard to see in the picture.


I didn’t put interfacing on the front facing pieces. With the fabric being so light it would have shown through and it wouldn’t have a floppy, relaxed look.


Immediately when I put it on I really didn’t like the bulk it created between the facing and the front at the hem. I need to figure a way to deal with this for any future versions.


I’ve worn this sweater twice now. The first time I felt okay about it. The second time I felt better. It’s super comfy and the fabric is so soft but my eyes zero in on that dropped shoulder seam every time. I just have to not look in the mirror when I wear it. That’s possible right?

I’m not making the garment for March. I don’t wear leggings except to exercise or chill in my Tardis jammies. So next up for me will be April’s Sew House 7 Bridgetown Dress.

It’s All in the Jeans

My first go at making Jamie Jeans by Named was a big mix of frustration and nerdiness. I did make them Han Solo inspired after all. My second bout with the pattern went much better because this go round I knew what I was in for. I knew which bits would be fiddly and which pieces I could fly through. I was armed and ready. Color me dangerous!

I bought dark blue stretch denim from SAS Fabrics in Phoenix specifically for a proper denim pair of Jamie Jeans. I put them off for a really long time.  My sewing machine does not handle denim well and I wasn’t ready for a frustrating sewing experience. Sewing is supposed to be fun! Isn’t that why we all do it? I did wash the fabric and promptly cut out the pieces. And there it sat… for months.

Fast forward to the end of June. I was finishing up my Jack of All Trades shirt. Something glitches on my Singer and as Hubby put it, it sounds like I was trying to sew with a nail gun.  I checked out her insides and everything looked fine. I wasn’t sewing through needles or heavy fabric. Both of which I’ve been known to do. I was sewing bias tape in the arms. It stitched fine (she’s been known to skip stitches so fine for her) except for the horrible sound. So I made a decision. It was time to buy a new machine. I’ve been talking about it for at least 6 months and I started casually looking. Now don’t think I’m being hasty and shipping the old girl off and that she’s probably a great machine she just needs serviced. I bought her for about $50 from a Meijer. She not worth servicing and I was due for an upgrade! She will be donated to a Goodwill so if someone else is willing to put in time and money she’s yours.

Why mention all this? Well new machine (Katherine by Babylock if you’re wondering) means better motor; i.e. denim destroyer! I was ready to create my Jamie Jeans. This was not the first project with the new lady in my life. I made a Sorbetto. I just haven’t blogged it yet. I’ve been having too much fun playing but I’ll try to put the post together later this week.

For me there’s two key items to any good pair of jeans, fit and the top stitching. Both can be frustrating but since I’ve made Jamie Jeans before I knew the fit was not problem and with my new lady and her assortment of feet, the top stitching should be a breeze.

I made a size ten and took 1″ out of the length of the crotch. Normally I take an 1″ off the top of most trouser patterns but I think you’re supposed to take it out middle crotchy area. Dunno. I need a shorter crotch length is what I’m getting at. I widened the calves just a smidge too. You’re supposed to sew with a 1 cm seam allowance but I did most of it with a 5/8″ seam allowance. It’s not much of a difference but enough to make them a bit more snug.


I serged all my edges but did my construction with my sewing machine. I used the blind hem foot and 1/4″ foot for all my top stitching with a 4mm length. Instead of a tack, I did a bit of decorative stitching instead. I love the little front pockets!


Here you can see a bit more top stitching, the cute pocket, and the pain in the ass belt loops. The belt loops were actually the most annoying part of making my jeans. They’re so little and they kept trying to squirm.


I did adjust where the pockets sit on the back. They’re meant to sit about 3/4″ lower but they end up on the back of my thigh. It makes for a sad looking rear. Oh yeah, don’t think that I don’t notice the slightly off top stitching dead center.

You can see in this pic how much I moved the pockets up. It made such a difference. You aren’t supposed to add them at the end but I always do because their placement is so critical to the booty.

I was hesitant about the gold top stitching but I’m glad I did it. You can see it pop on the sides and pocket. Since the pocket is made from two pieces there’s really no space for a design so that’s probably good. I over think that kind of stuff. Not sure why my eyes are shut. Maybe I’m dreaming of a grey pair.

This go round with the Jamie Jeans was far better than the first. I do plan on making more pairs. I really want a grey pair. Hot pink would be pretty awesome too! Proper jeans, check!

Almost forgot. Katherine does the alphabet!

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