Pattern Love

Pattern Love

I’ve read several different places that you can make your patterns last longer by ironing interfacing to the back of them. I’ve been really hesitant on doing this because ironing paper, especially flimsy pattern paper seems really sketchy. I was afraid that as soon as I touched the iron to it, it would burst into flames. I didn’t say it was a rational hesitation.

Pattern

I decided to start with my favorite, most used, I’m gonna bawl my eyes out if it ever falls apart pattern. This probably doesn’t sound too smart, but sometimes I’m not very bright. But really, if you’re going to do something, do it with a bang!

Iron

I bought the cheapest interfacing from Jo-Ann’s. It’s a whole $.99 a yard. I plopped on the floor with my iron and board. I first ironed the pattern pieces. I chose one of the lower settings because I was terrified. A couple swipes later I turned the heat up and my pattern pieces were smooth. This is going swell!

Interfacing

Next came the interfacing. I tried to maximize it by putting the pieces as close as I could together. If their edges touched that’s fine because they’ll be cut apart anyways. I rolled out the interfacing on my board, laid out pieces and started pressing. I was careful to get close to the edge but not so close that I would end up with a sticky mess on my iron. Once the pattern and the interfacing were stuck decently together I got out the scissors and cut around the pieces. The edges weren’t bonded together yet but that’s fine. After completely cutting around the piece I ironed the whole piece out. It really shouldn’t make a crinkly noise anymore. If it still has a crinkle sound, it’s not bonded somewhere.

Flexible

I was so surprised at how flexible yet sturdy the pattern pieces were. I used this pattern immediately after doing this. It was easy to pin through the pieces and having the interfacing on the back made the pieces sit still on the fabric when I was laying it out.

I plan on doing this to to a few more of my patterns. It’s not very time consuming, especially if the pieces are already cut from use. The only issue is that the pieces no longer fit in the pattern envelope. I’ll have to make plans to figure out a better system for containment.

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